My YouTube Subscriptions

In my post about TV watching habit changes I said I’d share my YouTube subscriptions. I’ve organized all of the channels into categories and given a very short description of each.

CrossFit


ArmenHammerTV
 – Reports on all things related to CrossFit.


CrossFit Mayhem
 – From Rich Froning and his gym. Workout videos, tips, and their podcast.


CrossFit
 – My favorite fitness program.


TeamRICHEY
 – Interviews, commentary on CrossFit news, and insights into the couple’s training. Craig’s humor speaks to me.

Electronics


Adafruit Industries
 – Company that makes a lot of great electronics.


Alex Eames
 – Develops Raspberry Pi accessories.


Arduino
 – Maybe the most popular microcontroller platform.


N-O-D-E
 – Develops some Raspberry Pi related projects. Reports on security, robotics, and other technology stuff.


Pimoroni
 – Company in the UK making a lot of great electronics.


Raspberry Pi
 – The best single board computer.


SparkFun Electronics
 – Another great electronics company.


The MagPi magazine
 – Official magazine for the Raspberry Pi.

Humor


standupmaths
 – Discusses math in a fun and humorous way.


The Pun Guys
 – These guys are punny.

Makers


Adam Savage’s Tested
 – I’ve categorized in the maker category because my favorite videos from the channel are Adam’s One Day Builds. They cover a lot of things, do product videos, etc.


Andrew Setters
 – Does woodworking and art projects.


April Wilkerson
 – Woodworking and metal working projects.


Becky Stern
 – Mostly electronics based projects, but also photography, other crafts, and even stuff related to her motorcycle.


Darbin Orvar
 – Woodworking and electronics projects.


Fisher’s Shop
 – Woodworking with a fun sense of humor.


I Like To Make Stuff
 – Modeling, woodworking, metal working, and electronics projects.


izzy swan
 – Woodworking, interesting jigs, and creative ways to use tools.


Jackman Works
 – Woodworking projects that are usually very unique.


Jeremy Fielding
 – Some more in-depth engineering stuff, like how motors work, building different machines, etc.


jimmydiresta
 – Very popular maker who mostly works with wood and metal.


David Waelder
 – He used to work with Jimmy Diresta. Still does some woodworking and metal projects.


Brett McAfee
 – Works with Jimmy Diresta, but also does his own woodworking and metal projects.


John Heisz – I Build It
 – Mostly woodworking, but also building different machines and some work with metal.


I Build It
 – John’s second channel with some different projects.


I Build It Scrap Bin
 – Another one of John’s channels with shorter videos and more talking.


Matthias Wandel
 – Mostly project videos about woodworking and building machines.


Matthias Wandel – Odds & Ends
 – His second channel with more random stuff.


Heisz Wandel project
 – Combined channel between John Heisz and Matthias Wandel, where they mostly discuss things related to their various channels.


Laura Kampf
 – Maker with her own unique style. She uses a lot of different materials and techniques.


Make Something
 – Woodworking projects presented in an easy to understand way.


Make:
 – Focused on DIY with a lot of technology.


Measured Workshop
 – Mostly woodworking projects.


One Minute Workbench
 – Aims to show the viewer how to make good use of limited workshop space and time.


Rich Rebuilds
 – Rebuilds Teslas and has started on some other electric vehicle projects.


SeanHodgins
 – Does some really neat electronics projects.


Simone Giertz
 – Famous for making shitty robots.


Steve Ramsey – Woodworking for Mere Mortals
 – Woodworking aimed at amateurs and people just starting.


Switch & Lever
 – Many unique projects with a variety of materials.


The Post Apocalyptic Inventor
 – He does a lot of electronics stuff, like repairing devices, but also makes things out of old motors, repurposes old stuff, and makes projects.


The Wood Whisperer
 – Focused on woodworking.

Miscellaneous


Hydraulic Press Channel
 – Crushing things with a hydraulic press to see how they hold up  or if they explode.


Beyond the press
 – Their second channel with a variety of focuses, including making jigs or parts to use with pressing, shooting things with a cannon, blowing stuff up, etc.


Kurt Hugo Schneider
 – Works with a variety of artists to create music videos.


LastWeekTonight
 – Hilarious take on various topics, usually something that’s been in the news.


Paul Momrik
 – My dad’s new channel, where we’ll post some of his hunting adventures.


Physics Girl
 – Physics and maths. Stuff that gets you thinking.

Technology


Apple
 – Think different.


Automattic
 – The company I work for!


Tesla
 – I love my Model 3!!

Quarterly Maker Box #MKR08 by Adam Savage Part 4

Progressing beyond the previous project where we assembled a model of Adam’s Cave, the final project of Quarterly Maker Box #MKR08, titled Build Your Own House/Apartment, involved building a model of our own. This was good timing because I’ve been putting together my own workshop in the basement over the last few months. Having a model would help with planning my use of the space and give me a different feel/perspective for the area.

My first step was outlining the entire workshop.

I also created a quick list of things I might want to add to the model after the structure was built.

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While the model of Adam’s Cave was in 1:48th scale I decided to build mine in 1:24th because my space is much smaller. Really glad I made this choice because it was still hard getting my big hands into some of the corners.

I wasn’t sure what to expect when I subscribed to Quarterly’s Maker Box and probably wouldn’t have known it existed or even thought about subscribing if I hadn’t seen that Adam Savage was getting involved for a couple of boxes. The projects he selected were much different from what I get from my AdaBox and HackerBox subscriptions, so a nice change of pace. I had a lot of fun and am looking forward to seeing what Adam does for #MKR09.

Quarterly Maker Box #MKR08 by Adam Savage Part 3

I completed this project well over a month ago and was waiting to finish the final project from Quarterly Maker Box #MKR08 so I could them together in the same post. Decided I’ll give that project a post of its own though.

This project from the box was titled Building My Shop in 1:48th Scale.

Making quick and dirty models from simple materials is one of the most important steps in building for me.

What could be simpler, cheaper, and more available than cardboard and hot glue? I’ve actually used cardboard boxes to create some cases for a couple of my electronics projects, the Garage Temperature Sensor & Monitor and Sound Card Oscilloscope.

I created a time-lapse while assembling the model of Adam’s Cave. I tried a completely new angle by attaching the camera to the light above my dining room table.

It can be hard to get details from a time-lapse, so here are some pictures of the completed model.

 

 

 

Also check out part 4 of this series, where I build a model of my own shop. If you want to see the previous projects, check out the unboxing and puzzle in part 1 and some drawings in part 2.

Unboxing HackerBox #0026: BioSense

The first HackerBox of 2018 arrived and it might be my favorite since I subscribed with #0018.

As suggested in the video, I’m not going to do pricing anymore. I proved the value in these boxes is there for the $$. It’s really hard to estimate prices on these custom kits, so it’s not worth the time. Here is a list of the contents copied from the Instructable for box #0026.

  • HackerBoxes #0026 Collectable Reference Card
  • Exclusive HackerBoxes BioSense PCB
  • OpAmp and Component Kit for BioSense PCB
  • Arduino Nano V3: 5V, 16MHz, MicroUSB
  • OLED Module 0.96 inch, 128×64, SSD1306
  • Pulse Sensor Module
  • Snap-Style Leads for Physiological Sensors
  • Adhesive Gel, Snap-Style Electrode Pads
  • OpenEEG Electrode Strap Kit
  • Shrink Tubing – 50 Piece Variety
  • MicroUSB Cable
  • Exclusive WiredMind Decal

Might be cool to turn this into something for use in my garage gym.

I am preparing a post with a bunch of stuff from the previous boxes I’ve been catching up on. Maybe I’ll wait to post that until I complete this build so I can be all caught up before #0027.

Quarterly Maker Box #MKR08 by Adam Savage Part 1

Several weeks ago, when I posted about Brain Candy Live!, I mentioned being a fan of Adam Savage’s work. Well, I saw him post a YouTube video announcing that he’d be curating a Maker Box for Quarterly and jumped on it. Apparently I’m not getting enough from my AdaBox and HackerBoxes subscriptions, which I already have a hard time keeping up with. I do love getting surprise packages and I understand some of it is paying for an experience.

It was unclear how many boxes Adam would be involved in, but it definitely sounded like multiple. Turns out there will be two, announced in a teaser of the first box. At $99 per box, it’s a pricey subscription compared to others. What they don’t tell you is that it’s another $8 for shipping, so really $107. Bit of a surprise when my other subscriptions include shipping in the quoted price.

The first of Adam’s boxes, which is Quarterly’s Maker Box #MKR08, arrived this week. Of course I did an unboxing video. Doing these has become good practice at describing things on-the-fly.

Neat box. Very unique. I’d been thinking about buying several items in the box, so it’s nice when a surprise comes through like this. Each Quarterly Maker Box must come with a puzzle that leads you to a web page about the contents. So naturally I worked on the puzzle before diving into the projects. To go along with one of the themes of the box, the puzzle involved doing a scaled drawing. It was actually a lot of fun and I think it turned out pretty well!

I’ll publish some other posts as I work on the projects.

AdaBox006: CircuitPython

The last AdaBox of the year was delivered yesterday. I was able to avoid spoilers so I did a quick unboxing video.

I’ve been wanting to try the AdaFruit M0 boards like the Circuit Playground Express, but figured they’d be including one soon in an AdaBox. Pays to wait, especially when I have a backlog of projects. This is a really neat microcontroller with a lot to explore. It works with the MakeCode block editor, which will be fun to hack around with.

More info on the box can be found in Adafruit’s Learn guide for AdaBox006.

On Note Taking

I’ve been using the iOS and Mac app Bear for about a year. I previously used Apple Notes and Simplenote. I use the app for work stuff, CrossFit workout plans, hobby projects, and many other notes. I digital notebook is convenient because my iPhone is always with me. The idea of a physical notebook has always interested me, but I haven’t been able to get into it. For example, I linked to bullet journaling earlier this year, which seems really cool. Something similar could be fun for creativity and inspiration. I think the biggest factor holding me back is I wouldn’t want to carry a notebook everywhere. Not that I leave home very often, but still.

Part of me really wants to sign up for a subscription to the Field Notes Quarterly Editions. I probably load up their site and add the subscription to my cart every couple of months. Then I remember the pile of notebooks I already don’t use.

So many potential notes to be written!

The group of 5 brown ones are actually Field Notes books. Not pictured is a larger Moleskin I keep in my workshop and have been using to sketch project plans. Once I start making a dent in this pile I can justify a subscription. Of course I could also make my own. I think the subscription interests me because I’ve become addicted to getting a surprise every month or quarter like with the AdaBox and HackerBox subscriptions. I also really love the design and simplicity of Field Notes.

There is one exception to my use of notebooks. I religiously use the Expedition series  to record my workouts. They’re perfect for the gym because the paper is water- and tear-proof; paper and sweat generally don’t mix well.

Full of numbers.

Writing this post reminded me I only have a few pages left in my last book so I placed an order for 2 new packs in case they stop making them. As a bonus, on the day I ordered, Field Notes were giving out a free 2-pack of Blue Wednesday with any order.

Now my stack of unused notebooks will be even larger.

If you have any journal or note taking habits, please share. I’d love to hear what works for you.

AdaBox004

I received the latest Adafruit AdaBox last Thursday and made this unboxing video.

 

As you may have guessed, AdaBox004 has a music theme. I’m excited because I’ll be using several of these parts in my current project. I need to finish it before the weekend so I guess I better get my ass in gear.

When you lay it out, this one seemed a light compared to the first 3 AdaBoxes, so I added up prices from the Adafruit store. It came to $73 without factoring in the empty white box for making a custom project enclosure, collectible “Boomy” pin, SD card, Make volume 57 signed by LadyAda, and free shipping. Probably about a $90 value for $60 as a subscriber, which is worth it. The $25 Music Maker FeatherWing with the $20 Feather HUZZAH really drove up the price, limiting what else could be included.

If you enjoyed the music in the video, it was released by Adafruit’s in-house musician to go along with this box. Check out “ADABOX004” on SoundCloud. BartleBeats also has a full album I’ve been listening to a lot while working at my hobby desk. “Frequency” is available on SoundCloud or via iTunes.

Next up… this morning I received the tracking info for HackerBox #0020. Note that AdaBox uses a 3 digit identification system, while the HackerBox uses 4 digits. The difference between a quarterly and a monthly subscription I guess.

Review: My Golf Locker

I decided to try out a new service, My Golf Locker, which sends you golf clothing and accessories matching a schedule and budget you select in your account. It looked neat.

It was not.

Their terrible web site should have tipped me off. Whenever you log in or visit your account page, you get a popup informing you of your successful log in, even if you were already logged in! Click out to another page, then click to access your account… “You’ve successfully logged in!” Talk about annoying.

The service lets you browse items on the site and select something if you want it included in your next shipment. Problem was, another piece of the service, would email you each day reminding you of an item you liked. It did this even after a box, which included the item they were relentlessly reminding me about, had been shipped.

When I looked at the contents of that first box, it included the rain pants I had selected and only 1 other item. A Nike golf shirt for $110! I don’t know who pays that much for a shirt, but definitely not me! If it was guaranteed to take 10 strokes off my score I might consider it.

I ended up finding a similar pair of rain pants at the Under Armor outlet in Birch Run for much cheaper so I returned the entire box. When the refund showed up on my credit card, I closed my account.

Don’t waste your time or money on My Golf Locker.

HackerBox #0018 – Circuit Circus

It’s not often an online ad catches my eye, but when I saw one for HackerBoxes, I clicked through. I’ve enjoyed Adafruit’s quarterly subscription service AdaBox and wondered if this was similar.

The HackerBoxes look lower quality, but are cheaper ($44 compared to $60, both with free shipping) and ship monthly instead of quarterly. The previous boxes listed on the site looked neat and sell for $59 before shipping so it seemed like a pretty good deal. I really like the idea of having something new to tinker with each month instead of only 4 times a year. I signed up and was surprised to get a shipment notification for the most recent box.

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This box is based around a little Transistor Tester kit you build. It also comes with a variety of extra electronic components that help go through a series of tutorials and aid in experimenting with circuits and the tester. If this box is any indication, I’m going to enjoy these each month.

It took me a couple of hours to assemble and solder the tester kit. I recorded it (had to stop twice to recharge the GoPro battery) and ended up with over 100 minutes of video! Nobody wants to watch all of that, so I cut out some empty space and sped it up to 20x.

Now I have a cool test device built by hand…