’67-’68 Michigan Map

Remember when everyone kept a map in their glovebox? This old Michigan map was in a stack of documentation the seller gave me when I bought the ’68 truck.

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The 1960 Census info on this map had Rogers City with a population of 4,722 and 98,265 for Saginaw. Quite a difference from 2,827 and 51,508 in 2010.

Stanley 743 Vise Restoration

This Stanley vise caught my eye at an estate sale last year. I think I paid $3 for it. The jaw snapped at some point and someone did a rough weld job to put it back together. The other side reads 743 – 2 IN.

I finally got around to cleaning it up. Most of the work was done with brass wire wheels on the bench grinder and drill. Then a little hand wire brushing and sandpaper to get the corners.

stanley-vise-restoration.jpg

Do you think I should paint it? I kind of like the bare metal look.

How I Convert Kilograms to Pounds

At our gym a couple sets of weights on the lifting platforms are in kilograms, which can be confusing in America. It doesn’t have to be confusing though; the math is actually quite simple.

In order to make the conversion you need to know that 1 kg is roughly 2.2 pounds. If you go out a few more decimal places it’s actually 2.20462, but that extra only ever makes a difference of a pound unless you’re setting world record deadlifts, so you can pretty much throw it out and call it close enough.

So…

1 kg = 2.2 pounds
10 kg = 22 pounds
100 kg = 220 pounds

You shouldn’t even need to think about those, but rarely do our weightlifting numbers fall on powers of ten. What about 53 or 97 kilos?

First double the number.

53 x 2 = 106

Then take care of the 0.2 part. Multiplying by 2 is already done, so take 106 and move the decimal place over.

10.6

Round up to 11.

106 + 11 = 117

Easy! How close does that come out? 53 x 2.20462 = 116.84486. Spot on. How about 97?

97 x 2 = 194

19.4

194 + 19 = 213

Here’s one where the extra 0.005 would have made a difference because 97 x 2.20462 = 213.84814 or 214 when rounded up. Close enough though. 😉

HackerBox #0029 Field Kit Updates

I’ve customized the items in the HackerBox Field Kit and explained everything in this video.

You can find the example code I put together for all of the modules in my hackerbox-29-field-kit GitHub repo.

hackerbox-0029-field-kit-modules-breadboard

I plan to keep the kit in my backpack, especially for trips up north when I visit family. Maybe I shouldn’t take this with me on flights though. Have you ever travelled with a bunch of wiring and electronics parts?

If you’re interested in an electronics community, join us on reddit and Discord.