Craftsman 12 Inch Wood Lathe

796d5e0d-a64b-4b34-bedd-4c90de7a10c2-3139-000002cc0aa2d9d6_fileEarlier this summer, I came across an auction online with a bunch of tools. The items were located up in Alpena and I was heading up to Long Lake for our family vacation in a few days. That’s only 10 miles north of town, so if I won anything I could pick it up locally instead of paying for shipping or needing to have my Dad pick it up. I bid on a few items, not really expecting anything, so I was surprised when I got an email telling me I “won” a lathe.

It is a Craftsman 12 Inch Wood Lathe (Model 113.23800) and was about $93 after fees and the auction house took their cut.

Here are a couple of pictures that were taken for the listing. It seemed to be in really good condition.

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The lathe had been sitting in my garage for over a month and I needed to start clearing some space, so I finally put some time into it. I unbolted everything from the table top and cleaned it up. Then I painted the stand and table top. I cut a base out of some 1/2″ plywood and attached four casters to make it mobile in my shop. I also picked up a new belt from Autozone. When I was assembling everything I noticed the pulleys weren’t aligned, so I drilled new mounting holes for the motor.

Between the belt, spray paint, and casters I put about $20 into it. It cleaned up well and I think the paint makes the stand look a lot better.

One thing it’s missing is the original belt guard so I’m building one. I’ll post details when it’s ready.

Stanley 743 Vise Restoration

This Stanley vise caught my eye at an estate sale last year. I think I paid $3 for it. The jaw snapped at some point and someone did a rough weld job to put it back together. The other side reads 743 – 2 IN.

I finally got around to cleaning it up. Most of the work was done with brass wire wheels on the bench grinder and drill. Then a little hand wire brushing and sandpaper to get the corners.

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Do you think I should paint it? I kind of like the bare metal look.

4-1/2″ Square Restoration

Little squares are handy to have around the shop. I got a 2-1/2″ one for Christmas and have is used it a lot already. I don’t know how this one lasted until day three of an estate sale, but it was a great find for $1. Only took about ten minutes with a brass wire wheel on the grinder to clean it up.

Craftsman Jointer Restoration

When I saw this Craftsman Jointer (model 113.232240) for $100 I couldn’t pass it up. Most jointers I’ve seen in the $100-150 range are shit.

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The manual is dated 5/97, so it’s over 20 years old. My Internet searching suggests this model originally sold for around $600. The only original parts that appear to be missing are the side panels, blade gauge, and push block. I bought a couple of push blocks this summer at an estate sale, so I’m set there.

They don’t make many tools like this anymore. This thing is a beast of solid metal and weighs a ton. Here it is in my basement. It had some rust, but otherwise it was in good shape and the rolling base was built well.

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I went at the table and fence with a razor blade, which easily removes most of the surface rust. I sprayed everything with WD-40, let it soak, and then did another pass with the razor blade. I love that feeling when you start to see some shine.

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Then I cleaned up the stand and the base. The leveling feet in the stand were rusted and beat to shit, so I trashed them. Drilled holes in the base and properly attached it to the stand with bolts instead of tape like the previous owner.

I replaced the bolts on the belt guard which were rusted really bad. A little elbow grease and a brass brush cleaned up some of the rest on other bolts throughout the stand. I removed the screws for the switch and ran them over a brass wire wheel on the grinder. I also took apart a lot of the fence assembly one piece at a time and used the brass wire wheel to clean it all up.

To continue cleaning the tables and fence I had to order a brass wire brush set for the drill. Everywhere in the area sells the steel wire set, which eats at the metal too much.

Look how much of a difference a few seconds makes.

I went over both tables and the fence with the brass brush and followed up with a polishing wheel. Then I put it all back together and applied a coat of paste finishing wax to those surfaces. Look at that shine! I love that you can see the reflection of the blade guard.

I could see a few nicks in the knives and they had some rust. I’d rather start with a fresh set, especially since they were only $17.

I’m going to add a dust/chip collection chute I can hook my hose up to, but that’ll be an upcoming project. Will wait until that’s completed to do final adjustments to the tables and knives since I’ll be removing the tool from the base several times.

Plumb Bob Restoration

I paid $1 for this plumb bob at an estate sale last month.

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I was cleaning my shop yesterday when I noticed it hanging on the wall and figured I’d bring some new life to it. Didn’t take long.

I removed the rust with a brass wire wheel on the grinder, replaced the string, and made a handle out of a piece of dowel.

More Eagle Oil Cans

I really fell in love with the look of the Eagle oil cans and ended up finding some more at estate sales. My first find was a can almost identical to the No. 66 my Dad gave me. I was going to clean it up for my brother, but I haven’t been able to unstick the trigger to take it apart. I’ve tried all kinds of stuff, so if you know any tricks, let me know.

Then I found two other Eagle cans that don’t have the No. 66 designation on the top, aren’t brass, and use a completely different pump mechanism and trigger. I like the feel of the triggers a lot better but the brass definitely looks cooler.

The large can was rusty and had all kinds of grease caked on. I cleaned it up and gave it a vinegar soak to take care of most of the rust. I didn’t want to get too aggressive with it and left some of the patina for a unique look. The small can had a teal-ish colored paint job and is in really good shape other than a dent. A few applications of Klean-Strip Premium Stripper got rid of the paint and I cleaned out the inside.

The middle oil can looks a lot darker in these photos than it is in person.

I wanted a place on the drill press cart to keep the original can, which is filled with cutting fluid. I whipped up a holder out of some scraps. It’s an ugly little box but does the job.

Homier Distributing Company BDM 5 Drill Press Restoration

My Dad gave me an old drill press that was sitting unused in his garage. Homier Distributing Company (HDC) made this BDM 5 model back in 1991. Over the years the machine accumulated a lot of rust, so I wanted to give it some new life.

It was a fun project and I really love how it turned out. It looks like a brand new tool.

I recorded a lot of video while working on this and tried to trim down to the important parts so I could explain the process I used.

If you have any questions or anything here helps you with a project of your own, leave a comment to let me know.

 

Eagle No. 66 Oil Can

I got this oil can from my Dad when he gave me his old drill press.

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It reminded me of so many things I’ve seen on American Pickers. I started cleaning it up and then was able to read the top. It’s an old Eagle 66 oil can and pretty collectible. They sell for anywhere from $25 to $50 or more on eBay.

As I was taking it apart, small parts were falling out. Uh oh! Thankfully I found a photo showing how everything goes together (source). After cleaning all of the parts, I grabbed a Scotch-Brite pad to give it a little more scrubbing. Bad idea on brass! It would have looked really stupid to stop since I had rubbed a pretty good area, so I ran with it and used the pad all over. There is still some patina left, but it would have looked much better without the mistake. I finished the main body, cap, and spout arm with 2 coats of Rust-Oleum Rust Inhibitor and filled it with cutting fluid to be used when drilling into metal.


I love this piece. Bringing something back from the grave is rewarding and fun.