How I Convert Kilograms to Pounds

At our gym a couple sets of weights on the lifting platforms are in kilograms, which can be confusing in America. It doesn’t have to be confusing though; the math is actually quite simple.

In order to make the conversion you need to know that 1 kg is roughly 2.2 pounds. If you go out a few more decimal places it’s actually 2.20462, but that extra only ever makes a difference of a pound unless you’re setting world record deadlifts, so you can pretty much throw it out and call it close enough.

So…

1 kg = 2.2 pounds
10 kg = 22 pounds
100 kg = 220 pounds

You shouldn’t even need to think about those, but rarely do our weightlifting numbers fall on powers of ten. What about 53 or 97 kilos?

First double the number.

53 x 2 = 106

Then take care of the 0.2 part. Multiplying by 2 is already done, so take 106 and move the decimal place over.

10.6

Round up to 11.

106 + 11 = 117

Easy! How close does that come out? 53 x 2.20462 = 116.84486. Spot on. How about 97?

97 x 2 = 194

19.4

194 + 19 = 213

Here’s one where the extra 0.005 would have made a difference because 97 x 2.20462 = 213.84814 or 214 when rounded up. Close enough though. 😉

Hybrid Performance Method – Push Only Program

I tweaked my back pretty bad during the CrossFit Open this year. It seemed a good opportunity to lay off the squats and deadlifts to ease up on my back. I found what looked like a good upper body focused lifting program from Hybrid Performance Method, which they call their Push Only program. The main focus was on bench press, but there was also a fair amount of overhead pressing, pull-ups, and accessory work as well. I started it on 4/4/2017.

The program was structured to be 4 workouts a week for the first 10 weeks, a 3 workout deload week, and then 3 days of testing max lifts in the 12th and final week. Since I still wanted to attend a couple of CrossFit classes a week and not lose too much conditioning, I planned from the start to stretch out the program. It usually took me 8-9 days to complete a full week of the programming. Today, 109 days (15 weeks + 4 days) after starting, I finished.

Before following this Push Only program, the longest special program I’ve followed is my Thruster Attack, which takes 10 weeks, but is only two workouts a week that take 20 minutes or less. This program was a total of 46 workout days and I did 44 of them. I skipped two of the pull-up focused days in the last four weeks and I think I skipped some accessory stuff on two of the lifting days. Well, I skipped a lot of the accessory stuff in the final week, which was all about hitting maxes. At that point I was ready for the program to be over and change my focus.

Overall I really enjoyed the program. For the first 7-8 weeks, each workout was taking me about an hour to complete. Once the weights got heavier, the time commitment increased. All of the upper body accessory work was perhaps the best part of the program. My shoulders have never felt this good for so long.

If I had to go back and change something, I wish I had increased some of the weights 10# instead of 5# from week to week, because it seemed like I wasn’t lifting anything heavy for the 3 main lifts until the 8th or 9th week. That very well could be by design though. I can’t help but wonder if stretching the program out over 15+ weeks affected my results in a positive or negative way? I’ll never know.

I saw improvements across the board (all weights are in pounds)…

  • Push Press: 245 -> 260 (video)
  • Bench Press: 275 -> 290 (video)
  • Shoulder Press: 180 -> 185 (video)
  • MAX Strict HSPU: 11 -> 17
  • MAX Kipping HSPU: 14 -> 23 (video)
  • 100x Bench Press @ 135#: 9:37 -> 8:43 (video)

I highly recommend checking out any of the Hybrid programs, which only cost about $35/month.

New Garage Gym Equipment

In addition to making my own Farmers Carry handles, I’ve picked up some new items to expand the garage gym.

I bought this 10 foot climbing rope on Amazon. The ceiling obviously isn’t high enough for rope climbs, but I can use it for legless climbs starting from a seated position on the floor or simply do rope pull-ups. Can never have too many ways to do a pull-up or hang!

An upper body lifting program I’ve been following assigns half kneeling single arm bottoms up kettlebell presses every week. When I’m at home I’ve been using a dumbbell, but it’s nowhere near the same stimulus as stabilizing the uneven weight of an upside down kettlebell. It’s a very challenging exercise; if you’ve never done them before you’ll have to start much lighter than you’d expect.

I picked up this adjustable kettlebell from Dick’s Sporting Goods plus two 10 pound plates and a 5. As pictured I took out 3 of the spacers, which are on the right side. With this combination I can adjust it anywhere from 20-45 pounds in 5 pound increments. I already have a 50# kettlebell at home as well as a 53# and 70# I keep at the gym since I use those a lot more there.

These furniture movers, or SuperSliders, work really well on the rubber gym flooring. You can put your heels or toes on one of these and slide your legs in and out for core work.

The Family Grows

I’d been thinking about getting a safety squat bar for a year or so. When EliteFTS had $100 off and free shipping on their Yoke Bar, it was too good to pass up. They had so many orders it took almost 2 months to arrive.